of 53
All materials on our website are shared by users. If you have any questions about copyright issues, please report us to resolve them. We are always happy to assist you.

(12) United States Patent (10) Patent No.: US 6,630,885 B2

Category:

Pets & Animals

Publish on:

Views: 2 | Pages: 53

Extension: PDF | Download: 0

Share
Description
USOO663O885B2 (12) United States Patent (10) Patent No.: US 6,630,885 B2 Hardman et al. (45) Date of Patent: Oct. 7, 2003 (54) ELECTRONICTIRE MANAGEMENT 4,730,188 A 3/1988 Milheiser SYSTEM 4,737,660 A
Transcript
USOO663O885B2 (12) United States Patent (10) Patent No.: US 6,630,885 B2 Hardman et al. (45) Date of Patent: Oct. 7, 2003 (54) ELECTRONICTIRE MANAGEMENT 4,730,188 A 3/1988 Milheiser SYSTEM 4,737,660 A 4/1988 Allen et al. 4,845,649 A 7/1989 Eckardt et al. (75) Inventors: Gordon E. Hardman, Boulder, CO 4,978, /1990 Brown (US); John W. Pyne, Erie, CO (US); 5,054,315 A 10/1991 Dosjoub Molly A. Hardman, Boulder, CO (US); Paul B. Wilson, Tallmadge, OH (US); David M. Coombs, Tucson, AZ (US); Brett W. Floyd, Longmont, CO (US) 5, '02, it al. 2Y- a--- (List continued on next page.) FOREIGN PATENT DOCUMENTS (73) Assignee: Bridgestone/Firestone North CA /2000 American Tire, LLC, Nashville, TN CA /2001 (US) EP O /2000 EP O989OO1 3/2000 (*) Notice: Subject to any disclaimer, the term of this EP /2000 patent is extended or adjusted under 35 (List continued on next page.) U.S.C. 154(b) by 0 days. Primary Examiner Daryl Pope (21) Appl. No.: 09/915,858 (74) Attorney, Agent, or Firm Michael R. Huber; Ronald y A. Sandler (22) Filed: Jul. 26, 2001 (57) ABSTRACT (65) Prior Publication Data An electronic tire maintenance System is provided for mea US 2002/ A1 Sep. 12, 2002 Suring a parameter of a device at a first location. The System includes a Sensor for measuring the device parameter and Related U.S. Application Data generating a data Signal representing the measured param (60) Provisional application No. 60/ , filed on Jul. 26, eter. The System also includes a microprocessor coupled to the Sensor for activating the Sensor on a first periodic basis (51) Int. Cl. ... G08B 26/00 to measure the device parameter. The microprocessor (52) U.S. Cl /505; 340/442; 340/444; includes a memory for storing the generated data signal 340/447; 73/146.5; 156/64; 156/123 representing the measured parameter. A transmitter and a (58) Field of Search /442, 443, receiver are coupled to the microprocessor. The micropro 340/444, 445, 447, 505; 73/146.5; 156/64, cessor periodically partially awakens to determine, on a 123 Second periodic basis, if a received transmission is a valid interrogation signal and, if So, fully awakens and responds to (56) References Cited the valid interrogation Signal, via the transmitter, by at least transmitting the last Stored measured parameter. In one U.S. PATENT DOCUMENTS embodiment, the device is a tire tag mounted inside a tire A 8/1981 Church that measures tire data and transmits that data to a remote 4,525,766 A 6/1985 Petersen Source in response to an interrogation request, an alert 4, A 9/1985 Petersen et al. condition, or automatically on a periodic basis. 4, /1986 Allen 4,695,823 A 9/1987 Vernon 101 Claims, 34 Drawing Sheets USER INTERFACE - 36 SITE 16-- US 6,630,885 B2 Page 2 U.S. PATENT DOCUMENTS 6,112,165 A 8/2000 Uhl et al. 6,112,585 9/2000 Schrottle et al. 5,109,213 4/1992 Williams 6,124,786 9/2000 Normann et al. 5,181,423 A 1/1993 Philipps et al. 6,124,787 A 9/2000 Isakov et al. 5,231,872 A 8/1993 Bowler et al. 6,147,659 A 11/2000 Takahashi et al. 5,301,553 A 4/1994 Schultz et al. 6, A 11/2000 Fermin Benimeli 5,335,540 A 8/1994 Bowler et al. 6,175,301 B1 1/2001 Piesinger 5,400,649 A 3/1995 Bartscher et al. 6,175,787 B1 1/2001 Breed 5,444,448 A 8/1995 Schuermann et al. 6,181,241 B1 1/2001 Normann et al. 5,448,242 A 9/1995 Sharpe et al. 6, B1 2/2001 Normann et al. 5,463,374. A 10/1995 Mendez et al. 6, B1 3/2001 Hahn et al. 5,471,212 A 11/1995 Sharpe et al. 6,217,683 B1 4/2001 Balzer et al. 5, A 12/1995 Handfield et al B1 4/2001 Imao 5,483,826 A 1/1996 Schultz et al ,929 B1 5/2001 Larson et al. 5,483,827 A 1/1996 Kulka et al. 6, B1 5/2001 Black 5,517,853. A 5/1996 Chamussy 6,243,007 B1 6/2001 McLaughlin et al. 5,521,846 A 5/1996 Lang et al. 6,246,317 B1 6/2001 Pickornik et al. 5,552,789 9/1996 Schuermann 6.255,940 B1, 7/2001 Phelan et al. 5, A 9/1996 Nowicki et al. 6,271,748 B1 8/2001 Derbyshire et al. 5,562,787 A 10/1996 Koch et al /64 6,369,712 B2 4/2002 Letkomiller et al. 5, /1996 Doyle 2001/ A1 4/2001 Smith et al. 5,600,301 A 2/1997 Robinson, III et al. 2001/ A1 5/2001 Hahn et al. 5,612,671 A 3/1997 Mendez et al. 2001/ A1 6/2001 Letkomiller et al. 5,656,993 A 8/1997 Coulthard 2001/ A1 12/2001 VanHorn et al. 5,661,651 8/1997 Geschke et al. 2002/ A1 4/2002 Derbyshire et al. 5,673,037 A 9/1997 Cesar et al. 2002/ A1 10/2002 Tuttle 5,710,539 1/1998 Iida 2002/ A1 10/2002 Goodwin, III 5,717,376 A 2/1998 Wilson 2002/O A1 10/2002 Carrender et al. 5, A 3/1998 Schultz et al. 2002/O A1 10/2002 Shanks et al. 5,731,754 A 3/1998 Lee, Jr. et al. 2002/O A1 10/2002 Shanks et al. 5, A 4/1998 Handfield et al. 2002/O A1 10/2002 Shanks et al. 5,774,047 6/1998 Hensel, IV 2002/O A1 10/2002 Shanks et al. 5,780,733 7/1998 Meunier 5,783,992 A 7/1998 Eberwine et al. FOREIGN PATENT DOCUMENTS 5,825,286 10/1998 Coulthard EP /2000 5,827,957 A 10/1998 Wehinger EP O 1/2001 5,895,846 A 4/1999 Chamussy et al. WO WO 97/ /1997 5, A 6/1999 Ohashi et al. WO WO 97/ /1997 5, A 7/1999 Aslanidis et al. WO WO 97/ /1997 5,939,977 A 8/1999 Monson WO WO 98/ /1998 5,945,908 A 8/1999 Nowicki et al. WO WO 99/ /1999 5,945,938 A 8/1999 Chia et al. WO WO 99/ /1999 5,955,949 A 9/1999 Cocita WO WO 99/ /1999 5,963,128 A 10/1999 McClelland WO WO 99/ /1999 5,965,808 A 10/1999 Normann et al. WO WO 99/ /1999 5,974,368 A 10/1999 Schepps et al. WO WO 99/ /1999 6,016,102 A 1/2000 Fortune et al. WO WO 99/ /1999 6,018,993 A 2/2000 Normann et al. WO WO 99/ /1999 6,025,777 A 2/2000 Fuller et al. WO WO 99/ /1999 6,025,780 A 2/2000 Bowers et al. WO WO OO/ /2000 6,034,597 A 3/2000 Normann et al. WO WO OO/ /2000 6,043,737 A 3/2000 Shehan et al. WO WO OO/ /2000 6,043,738 A 3/2000 Stewart et al. WO WO OO/ /2000 6,061,614 A 5/2000 Carrender et al. WO WO OO/ /2000 6,062,072 A 5/2000 Mock et al. WO WO OO/ /2000 6,084,530 7/2000 Pidwerbetsky et al. WO WO 01/ /2001 6,087,930 A 7/2000 Kulka et al. 6,107,917 A 8/2000 Carrender et al. * cited by examiner U.S. Patent Oct. 7, 2003 Sheet 1 of 34 US 6,630,885 B2 S S & LI O c - L H 2 U.S. Patent Oct. 7, 2003 Sheet 2 of 34 US 6,630,885 B2 Fig 1B 2OA U.S. Patent Oct. 7, 2003 Sheet 3 of 34 US 6,630,885 B2 }~~ r-~ ~--~~~~ n- ~~~~ U.S. Patent Oct. 7, 2003 Sheet 4 of 34 US 6,630,885 B2 as U.S. Patent Oct. 7, 2003 Sheet S of 34 US 6,630,885 B2 U.S. Patent Oct. 7, 2003 Sheet 6 of 34 US 6,630,885 B2 `````,, U.S. Patent Oct. 7, 2003 Sheet 7 of 34 US 6,630,885 B2 i. U.S. Patent Oct. 7, 2003 Sheet 8 of 34 US 6,630,885 B l- f a m 1 s o Vt M T w M U.S. Patent Oct. 7, 2003 Sheet 9 of 34 US 6,630,885 B2 U.S. Patent Oct. 7, 2003 Sheet 10 of 34 US 6,630,885 B2 s a NNN w U.S. Patent Oct. 7, 2003 Sheet 11 of 34 US 6,630,885 B2 Fig. 11A GE) 39H U.S. Patent US 6,630,885 B2 Ya NELLSWS TV/NHEILXE U.S. Patent Oct. 7, 2003 Sheet 14 of 34 US 6,630,885 B2 Fig. 14 SAR COMMAND PROCESS 4OO COMPARATOR VALUE XOR 4O2 TAG SERIAL NUMBER 404 4O LOGICAL XOR RESULT MASKNUMBER FROM READER COMMAND D AND 412 LOGICAL AND RESULT = O LOGICAL AND RESULT... O RESPOND WITH TAG SERIAL NUMBER, DO NOT RESPOND 41 O 414 U.S. Patent Oct. 7, 2003 Sheet 15 of 34 US 6,630,885 B2 Fl8 1 5 READER SARACQUISTION FLOW DAGRAM 424 SET MASK VALUE TO ZERO 420 IN VIEW - FALSE 422 Y SEND SARCOMMAND GOOD RESPONSE 426 SET COMPARATOR VALUE =RESPONSE SET MASK = 24 SELECT TEMPORARY ID 430 SEND SAR COMMAND 428 GOOD BAD OR NO 432 RESPONSE RESPONSE 434 S/NACQUSITIONS/NACQUISITION 436 COMPLETE FAILED U.S. Patent Oct. 7, 2003 Sheet 16 of 34 US 6,630,885 B2 30 Fig. 16 FSK RECEIVER PIC CONTROLLER U.S. Patent Oct. 7, 2003 Sheet 18 of 34 US 6,630,885 B2 Fig. 18 PROTOCOLOVERVIEW 3OO PERFORM READ/WRITE OPERATIONS TERMINATE SELECTION, OPTIONAL-D OF TAG w U.S. Patent Oct. 7, 2003 Sheet 19 of 34 US 6,630,885 B2 FLPS 310 PACKET TIMING U.S. Patent Oct. 7, 2003 Sheet 20 of 34 US 6,630,885 B2 (ID s U.S. Patent Oct. 7, 2003 Sheet 22 of 34 US 6,630,885 B2 CO O S O ed 2 9 P LL- 9 L R S A. { 7 CN od S as as 1. % H. H. 9 X S2 2 - S ; : Sc SZ I so g g CO H S?t O = - O SE n - H () 2 N h O 3 CD s H O G LL- L k o C CD L LL P L LL L L - CD LL l - n d O U.S. Patent Oct. 7, 2003 Sheet 23 of 34 US 6,630,885 B2 U.S. Patent Oct. 7, 2003 Sheet 24 of 34 US 6,630,885 B2 Oo2. O- Oo, o, y O O O d 9. i (ISd)3 nssadd -N (-OZ) OOOOLVino WO U.S. Patent Oct. 7, 2003 Sheet 25 of 34 US 6,630,885 B2 Fig. 25 TAG FIRMWARE LAYERS NITIALIZATION LAYER DISTINGUISHES BETWEEN POWER ON, WAKEUP FROM SLEEP, AND WATCHDOGTIMER FAULT LUCID SLEEP LAYERQ.2 WAKEUP FROM REM SLEEP. PROCESSLUCID SLEEP MODE, TRANSTION TO WORK MODE IF FORWARD LINKPACKETS ARE AVAILABLE. REENTER REMSLEEP MODE IF PACKETS ARE NOT AVAILABLE. HANDLE HIGH AND LOW SPEED CLOCKTRANSITIONS. SENSORLAYER 929 PERFORM SENSORWAKEUP PROCESS. READ SENSORS, FILTER SENSOR DATA, AND ARCHIVEDATAIF NECESSARY. TEST FOR ALARM CONDITIONS AND PROCESS ACCORDINGLY IF OUT-OF-LIMIT CONDITIONS EXIST. INITIATE AUTONOMOUSTRANSMIT FREQUIRED. FIG PACKETLAYER HANDLE LOWLEVEL FORWARD AND RETURN LINK BT PROTOCOL PERFORM FORWARD LINK PREAMBLE DISCRIMINATION. EEPROMLAYERFG.29 SAVES AND RESTORES TAG CONFIGURATION INFORMATION, MANAGES ARCHIVED DATA, AND PROVIDES STORAGE FOR FACTORY AND USER CONSTANTS. MAIN LOOPLAYERS89 MAINTAIN SEARCHFOR FORWARD LINK PACKETS, PERFORM SANITY CHECKROUTINES TOMAINTAIN GENERAL SUBSYSTEM INTEGRITY. UPDATE HEALTH STATUS LEVEL-2 ERRORBITS. RECOVER FROM FATAL ERRORS. FG.31 COMMAND LAYER 1s-1 PROCESS FORWARD LINK COMMANDS AND MACROS. ACOURE AND MANTAIN TEMPORARY IDENTIFICATION, DETERMINE TARGETED COMMANDS, AND BUILD RETURN LINK PACKETS. U.S. Patent Oct. 7, 2003 Sheet 26 of 34 US 6,630,885 B2 Fig. 26 INITIALIZATION LAYER WDT DETERMINE SOURCE OF RESET 46O 468 CLEAR HEALTH STATUS AND INITIALIZE EEPROM HEADERWORD SET WDTERROR BIT IN HEALTH STATUS NITIALIZEUSING EEPROM CONFIGURATION VALUES CALL SANITY CHECK PROCESS SANITY CHECK OKAY? SET EEP CNFG ERROR IN HEALTH STATUS 474 ENTER LUCID SLEEP LAYER INITIALIZEUSING SYSTEM DEFAULT VALUES 476 U.S. Patent Oct. 7, 2003 Sheet 27 of 34 US 6,630,885 B2 Fig. 27 LUCD SLEEP LAYER 480 ENTER FROMINITIALIZATION LAYER IS WAKEUP REG = O2 486 DECREMENT WAKEUPREG, SET WDT OK, GO TO SLEEP DECREMENT SENS PER CNTR. IF O, TURN ON SENSORS. 490 TRANSFER OOR LSTN RID TO OOR LSTN CNTR, TRANSFER HS SAMPLE RID TO OOR LSTN PRS. TRANSFER WAKEUP RID TO WAKEUP REG. CLEARTEMP ID. IF SENSORS ARE ON, CALL SENSORLAYER 492 TURN ON RECEIVER AND ENABLE INTERRUPTS. DETECT POSSIBILITY OF FORWARD LINK PACKET PRESENCE. 494 BEGIN MAIN LOOP LAYER. U.S. Patent Oct. 7, 2003 Sheet 28 of 34 US 6,630,885 B2 Fig. 28 SENSORLAYER TIME TO READ SENSORS p 500 TURN ON SENSOR 5O2 POWER. SET A/D CHANNEL TO TEMPERATURE RETURN TO INITIALIZATION LAYER 516 DELAY TO ALLOW SENSORS TO STABILIZE ARCHIVE TEMPERATURE AND PRESSURE IF REGUIRED 506 READ TEMPERATURE. SWITCH TO A/D CHANNEL TO PRESSURE 512 PROCESS PRESSURE FILTER O PROCESS TEMPERATURE READ PRESSURE. TURN FILTER WHILE PRESSURE IS STABILIZING. OFF SENSOR POWER U.S. Patent Oct. 7, 2003 Sheet 29 of 34 US 6,630,885 B2 Fig. 29 EEPROMLAYER EEP HEAD = EEP TAIL OVERRUN ALLOWED? SET OVERRUNERROR BT 524 INCREMENTEEP TAIL. WRAP POINTERF NECESSARY. SET OVERRUN BIT TRANSFER RAM DATA TO EEPROMATEEP HEAD LOCATION INCREMENTEEP HEAD, WRAP POINTERF NECESSARY 532 RETURN TO CALLING PROCESS. U.S. Patent Oct. 7, 2003 Sheet 30 of 34 US 6,630,885 B2 Fig. 3 O MAN LOOPLAYER 540 CLEAR WATCHDOGTIMER TEST FOR ABORTED PREAMBLE TEST, RE-ENABLE RECEIVER DATA INTERRUPTS IF EXCESSIVE 542 RECEIVER HAS DISABLED THEM. RECEIVERNOISE DETECTED IN THE PACKETLAYER. CALL SANITY CHECK PROCESS 55O LONG MACRO Y CALL COMMAND PENDING? - COMMAND LAYER 548 PACKET OK FLAG Y T FROMPACKET LAYER DECREMENT OOR LSTN CNTR. IF = 0, THEN SET FLAGWDT OK AND GO TO SLEEP. CALL COMMAND LAYER U.S. Patent Oct. 7, 2003 Sheet 31 of 34 US 6,630,885 B2 Fig. 31 COMMAND LAYER 62O 622 FORWARD LINK ARGETING US? IGNORE PACKET SET CMD ERR BIT IN HEALTH STATUS 636 VALID MACRO COMMAND? MMEDIATE RESPONSE MACRO2 EXECUTE SAR PROCESS EXECUTE MACRO. STORE RESULT INTAGRAM 638 BUILD RETURN LINK WITH IMMEDIATE RESPONSE. BUILD RETURN LINK WITH TAGS/N 64O CALL PACKET LAYER TO SEND RETURN LINK PACKET. 628 U.S. Patent Oct. 7, 2003 Sheet 32 of 34 US 6,630,885 B2 Fig. 32 PREAMBLE BITS DATA SPACE ITT I I I I I I I r, POSSIBLE RECEIVERNOISE PREAMBLE TERMINATION U.S. Patent Oct. 7, 2003 Sheet 33 of 34 US 6,630,885 B2 Fig. 33 PREAMBLE DISCRIMINATION ENTER TRANSITION INTERRUPT 560 SERVICE YGOT PREAMBle-562 N 57O 68 u1imsn N N TOO LONG TOO SHORT2 Y 568 PRESEREMPLE) 582 TOO MANY POLARITY? MANY SHORT PREAMBLE BITS RECEIVED O Y PREAMBLE BITS RECEIVED? TERMINATE BAD PREAMBLE SEARCH - DISABLE REINITIALIZE INTERRUPTS 576 ENOUG Y EXIT-584' 574 SET FLAG GOT PREAMBLE, SET FLAGBIT POLARITY. COMPUTE TIMER THRESHOLD AS 75% OF LAST TIMER READING.INITIALIZE LOOP COUNTERTO COUNT FORWARD LINKPACKETBITS, THEN EXIT GO TO SHIFT DATAu-564 PROCESS U.S. Patent Oct. 7, 2003 Sheet 34 of 34 US 6,630,885 B2 8 SHIFT DATA PROCESS 590 SHIFT DATA PROCESS 594 INTERVAL ABOVE THRESHOLD? 592 WAT FOR NEXT TRANSiTION. EXIT INTERRUPT SHIFT IN FORWARD LINK BIT AS THE COMPLIMENT OF THE FORWARD LINK PORT BIT OO GOT RETURN LINK CHANNEL DATA2 SHIFT BIT INTO RETURN LINK CHANNEL REGISTER SHIFT BIT INTO FORWARD LINK REGISTERS 6O2 Y 608 N EXIT INTERRUPT TERMINATE FORWARD LINK 61O Y SET FLAG PACKET OK. DISABLE TRANSiTION INTERRUPTS. EXIT TRANSITION INTERRUPT SERVICE. 612 1 ELECTRONIC TRE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION This application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Application Ser. No. 60/220,896, filed on Jul. 26, 2000, which is assigned to the assignee of the present application. The applicants are claiming priority to this provisional application, making the effective filing date of this applica tion Jul. 26, FIELD OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates in general to tire parameter monitoring Systems and in particular to an electronic tire management System that has an electronic circuit in each tag that can conserve power by sleeping and that wakes up' periodically to measure and Store tire parameters Such as temperature and pressure and then, when partially awake, looks for interrogation Signals from a remote unit. The tag responds to that interrogation, if it is valid, by transmitting tire parameter information to the remote unit. The tag may also be programmed to wake up periodically, and transmit the last Stored parameters on an autonomous basis, without interrogation. The tag also may be programmed to provide an alert transmission if more immediate attention is required. BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION It is desirable to monitor tires for parameters Such as temperature and pressure. It is particularly advantageous to monitor large tires for off-the-road (OTR) vehicles since these tires are very expensive and must be regularly main tained to maximize vehicle and tire efficiency. In the past, tire monitoring devices have ranged from Systems that monitor tire pressure by connections to the valve stem (U.S. Pat. No. 4,734,674), to systems that use magnetic coupling to receive the Signals external of the tire (U.S. Pat. No. 4,588,978), to sophisticated systems that measure rate of change of pressure in the tire and then change the rate of transmission of the data depending upon the rate of change of pressure (U.S. Pat. No. 5,656,992). Other Systems are activated by a radio frequency transmis Sion that energizes the tire tag circuit by inductive coupling devices. See U.S. Pat. No. 5,166,676. Passive devices that rely on inductive magnetic coupling or capacitive coupling generally have the disadvantage of requiring lengthy coil windings, thus requiring major modi fications in the tire construction and assembly process. Another Serious disadvantage with Such passive devices is that the interrogator must be positioned in very close prox imity to the tire, usually within a few inches of the tire, in order to allow communication between the tire and the device. Because of the proximity requirements, continuous monitoring is impractical Since it would essentially require that an interrogator be mounted at each wheel of the vehicle. Manual acquisition of the data from the passive devices embedded in each of the tires is also cumbersome and time-consuming because of the proximity requirements. Other prior art devices used for monitoring tire conditions are comprised of Self-powered circuits that are positioned external of the tire, Such as at the valve stem. Externally mounted devices have the disadvantage of being exposed to damage Such as from weather and Vandalism. Additionally, externally installed devices can easily become disassociated from a particular tire that is being monitored. US 6,630,885 B Another disadvantage with known tire monitoring and identification devices is that communication transmissions are achieved using conventional radio frequencies that gen erally require a relatively large antenna which must be mounted externally or Secured to the tire in Such a manner that relatively major modifications are required in the tire construction or assembly process. Various ones of these problems have been addressed by the devices shown and described in U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,500, 065; 5,562,787; 5,573,610; and 5,573,611. However, these devices are contained within the tire wheel chamber and have difficulty transmitting data through the tire to external receivers. Also Some additional devices are contained within valve stems that do not attached directly to the tire so they do not provide a permanent record of the tire Since a different tire could be removed and replaced with another tire on the same rim containing the device. Also, these prior art devices either attach to the tire, to the wheel, or to the Valve stem exclusively and do not provide design flexibility which is desired in many applications. Also, when using RF frequency communication, difficul ties are encountered in transmitting the Signals to a remote location due to the Signals being required to pass through the tire Sidewall(s), which, due to tire thickness at this location, materially reduces the transmission efficiency thereof. It has been observed that the amount of carbon content in the tire affects transmissibility of RF signals thus posing problems for antenna designs. Further, problems occur with prior art antennae etched into or placed on a Substrate or printed circuit board. Good transmissions from Such construction may occur in one direction only through the tire Sidewalls. A tire may be reverse' mounted with the tag on an inside wall. Such mounting may increase the difficulty of trans mitting through the tire Sidewalls in the desired direction. It would be desirable to have an antenna Structure that can transmit in at least two directions through both Sidewalls. Although the tire monitoring devices disclosed in the above-mentioned documents provide limited advantages, a tire monitoring System is needed that provides Versatility and flexibility by permitting Separation of System functions into discrete components capable of improving external RF communication reception in terms of Signal/noise ratio, reproducibility and distance. Separate components are used, but combined into a Single device Structure, including a measuring device attached directly to the tire inner liner to Sense temperature, pressure, and other tire parameters, and a transponder which is associated with the tire for transmit ting data from the tire/wheel to a Separate external receiver. In addition, advantages in programming the transponder enable enhanced battery life, thus extending the useful life of the transponder. It also may be desirable to read the tire data as a vehicle passes a Standing interrogator. Therefore, a quick and posi tive identification System for each active tag is highly desirable. The present invention provides improved cycling arrange ments for battery conservation, novel tag identification techniques, and flexibility in the transponder's transmission performance. SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention overcomes the disadvantages of the prior art by providing an electronic tire tag management System in
Search Related
We Need Your Support
Thank you for visiting our website and your interest in our free products and services. We are nonprofit website to share and download documents. To the running of this website, we need your help to support us.

Thanks to everyone for your continued support.

No, Thanks