of 23
All materials on our website are shared by users. If you have any questions about copyright issues, please report us to resolve them. We are always happy to assist you.

Endemic family. Lomolino et al., PDF

Category:

Food

Publish on:

Views: 68 | Pages: 23

Extension: PDF | Download: 0

Share
Description
Endemic family 1 Lomolino et al., 2006 Endemic species Lomolino et al., Cosmopolitan family Lomolino et al., Cosmopolitan species 4 Biogeographic boundaries
Transcript
Endemic family 1 Lomolino et al., 2006 Endemic species Lomolino et al., Cosmopolitan family Lomolino et al., Cosmopolitan species 4 Biogeographic boundaries 5 Plants What s an angiosperm? gymnosperms angiosperms en.wikipedia.org/wiki 6 Rise of Angiosperms 7 Distribution of pines and southern beeches Long dispersal distances, ocean barriers prevented cold-adapted angiosperms to colonize Northern Hemisphere high latitudes 100 pine species, only several southern beech species (unusual) 8 Biogeographic realms 9 Nearctic/Palearctic Regions Two regions have similar mammals, angiosperms similar environmental conditions physical connections leading to substantial exchange Mammal fauna smaller than that of tropics 13 families of terrestrial mammals in Nearctic 18 in Palearctic Dominated by placentals (none in Palearctic, one in Nearctic) More species during Pleistocene than today Cooling and glaciation in Pleistocene produced cold-adapted mammals; cycles caused extinctions 10 Neotropical Region Mammals: 23 families many families shared with Nearctic (e.g., foxes, rabbits, mountain lions) New World monkeys 3 families, 84 species of marsupials Angiosperms: most diverse region (137 families, 50 endemic) shared families with other regions High biodiversity: environmental variety: tundra, temperate and tropical forests, desert geologic history: early connections with Africa, Antarctica; exchange with Nearctic 11 Ethiopian Region Has most diverse mammal fauna: 30 families charismatic megafauna some families shared with Palearctic, Oriental later collision with Eurasia few/none shared with Neotropical, Australasian early separation from S. America, Australia, Antarctica Angiosperms: diverse region (117 families) shared families with Neotropical, Australasian continents still together during rise of angiosperms 12 Oriental Region Small in area Has diverse mammal fauna: 20 families families shared with Palearctic, Ethiopian none shared with Australasian no marsupials, placentals before collision with Eurasia Angiosperms: diverse region (120 families) shared families with Neotropical, Australasian 13 Australasian Region Small in area, but most distinct Mammals: 10 families; high degree of endemism dominated by marsupials Angiosperms: 90 families (lowest) only 18 are endemic; Eucalyptus an example (95% of tree biomass) shared families with Neotropical, Oriental, Ethiopian 14 Biogeographic Mapping and Conservation Planning: World Wildlife Fund (WWF) Ecoregions Biodiversity ignores national and other political boundaries, so a more relevant conservation planning unit is required - WWF addresses this need with ecoregions. (www.worldwildlife.org/science/ecoregions) Ability to focus conservation efforts strategically is hindered by a global map of biodiversity with sufficient biogeographic resolution to reflect the complex distribution of natural communities (Olson et al., 2001) 15 Biogeographic Mapping and Conservation Planning: World Wildlife Fund (WWF) Ecoregions Ricketts et al., Biogeographic Mapping and Conservation Planning: World Wildlife Fund (WWF) Ecoregions Olson et al., Biogeographic Mapping and Conservation Planning: World Wildlife Fund (WWF) Ecoregions Olson et al., Biogeographic Mapping and Conservation Planning: World Wildlife Fund (WWF) Ecoregions Olson et al., Biogeographic Mapping and Conservation Planning: World Wildlife Fund (WWF) Ecoregions Olson et al., Biogeographic Mapping and Conservation Planning: World Wildlife Fund (WWF) Ecoregions WWF Global 200 a first attempt to identify a set of ecoregions whose conservation would achieve the goal of saving a broad diversity of the Earth's ecosystems. These ecoregions include those with exceptional levels of biodiversity, such as high species richness or endemism, or those with unusual ecological or evolutionary phenomena. 21 Biogeographic Mapping and Conservation Planning: World Wildlife Fund (WWF) Ecoregions WWF Global 200 vision: Identify and map priority areas critical to maintaining biodiversity The vision should fulfill these basic tenets of conservation biology: Representation of all distinct natural communities within conservation landscapes and protected areas networks Maintenance of ecological and evolutionary processes that create and sustain biodiversity; Maintenance of viable populations of all native species; and Conservation of blocks of natural habitat large enough to be resilient to large-scale stochastic and deterministic disturbances and long-term changes. 22 Biogeographic Mapping and Conservation Planning: World Wildlife Fund (WWF) Ecoregions 23
We Need Your Support
Thank you for visiting our website and your interest in our free products and services. We are nonprofit website to share and download documents. To the running of this website, we need your help to support us.

Thanks to everyone for your continued support.

No, Thanks