of 3
All materials on our website are shared by users. If you have any questions about copyright issues, please report us to resolve them. We are always happy to assist you.

Normality and Eating

Category:

Documents

Publish on:

Views: 72 | Pages: 3

Extension: PDF | Download: 0

Share
Description
Normality is a word that society has created in order to maintain social order, through conformity. It stems into social norms, culture and values. Normality is defined as standards of behavior and thinking in a specific group. Thus normality is emphasized in eating behaviours, the way individuals are “supposed” to eat, and an individual’s relationship with food. Abnormal behaviours of eating are classified as “eating disorders”, in which individuals diagnosed with this stem outside the “norm” o
Transcript
  Normality is a word that society has created in order to maintain social order,through conformity. It stems into social norms, culture and values. Normality isdefined as standards of behavior and thinking in a specific group. Thus normality is emphasized in eating behaviours, the way individuals are “supposed” to eat,and an individual’s relationship with food. Abnormal behaviours of eating are classified as “eating disorders”, in which individuals diagnosed with this stemoutside the “norm” of how people are to eat  . Eating disorders are caused byinfluences in the media, the social environment and individual factors. Thus theconcept of normality plays a significant role in the increase of eating disorders.Normal defines all the behaviours that people are expected to behave and conform to in a society or a specific culture. “Norm: Common standards and belief  s which guide member’s responss in all established groups. Norms are the specific manifestations of values. Thus social norms induce conformity in the group behavior and ethical judgements.” In relationship to eating andinteractions with food, “Normal eat  ing is being able to eat when you are hungryand continue eating until you are satisfied.. Normal eating is overeating at times:feeling stuffed and uncomfortable. It is also undereating at times and wishingyou had more. Normal eating is trusting your body to make up for yourmistakes.. It varies in response to your emotions, your schedule, your hunger, and your proximity to food.” (Fallon P, Katzman M, Wooley S) . Through statistics,it is found that more females are susceptible to developing these eating disordersthan males. The direct relationship of image and eating is what triggers manyfemales to develop these disorders in order to achieve the right body size andshape. Aesthetical norms of the female body have changed over time. Centuries ago, the “plump” woman was seen as healthy and physically wealthy. In modernsociety, what is now seen has aesthetically ideal, now dictated by popular media, is that of a “emaciated, tall female, with a slender frame and hauntingly perfect facial features.” These expectations and ideals reflected through the media, is what causes many individuals particularly females to conform and to “fulfill” these expectations so as to be part of the social norm of that society. Thus themedia suggests that in order to reflect a normal appearance, one must eat abnormally.Normality exists so that individuals conform to these ideals and values. An idealbody shape for both men and women are established in order for individuals toconform and thus fit into a certain society. This conformity to the norm givesindividuals a sense of security and unity, fulfilling the expectations of theaesthetic body in a society through disordered eating. There are certain personality types that strive to conform to society’s norms, these individual s aremore susceptible in forming abnormal eating behaviours, these personality typesinclude perfectionists, goal-oriented, and those with low self esteem. Many females feel a growing duty to fulfill western culture’s definition of “femaleidentity” which was in a sense being attractive, pleasing and unassertive. but haschanged over time leading to cultural confusions of the female role.Homosexuality and conflict over sexual identity are common among men witheating disorders. Within the gay community, there is an emphasis on thinness asa principle for attractiveness. A central issue in males with eating disorders is that they seem to be “afflicted with profound doubts about their masculinity”.   The social environment heavily impacts in the prevalence of eating disorders.The social environment includes the individual’s school environment, peer pressure, work and lifestyle which are greatly influential. Social messages areconstantly directed at women, emphasizing the importance of their body imageto achieving success and control. Many individuals fear rejection and strive foracceptance in a community which cause few individuals to undergo great lengthsto achieve a sense of security and belonging into a community. Some individualsare more susceptible to abnormal eating such as those with personality typesthat seek the approval of others, perfectionism and low self esteem. These eatingdisorders stray from the normal eating habits because they affect the diagnosedindividual in unhealthy ways and overall unstabilises their wellbeing. Sufferersof binge eating often feel embarrassed and guilty are very secretive of their habits. “During and after the binge, there are overwhelming feelings of self  - loathing and depression about the amount eaten.” These de trimental impactsindicate, that these eating habits are abnormal as “normal eating” relate to emotions of satiety and contentment. Verbal bullying and peer pressure inschool environments also contribute to triggering eating disorders most commonly anorexia nervosa. Sufferers of anorexia experience many physicalside effects which include loss of menstrual periods, imbalanced body chemicals,hormonal changes, osteoporosis, mental confusion and lethargy. Thus a disorderthat wants to prove achievement of the thinness ideal – the norm so heavilyinfluenced in social environments such as school produces abnormal bodyfunctioning and a collapse in wellbeing. Therefore normality or the absence of it,plays a significant role in defining an eating disorder.Individual factors plays a role in triggering an eating disorder. Sufferers of bingeeating disorder often have trouble expressing their emotions, they will often “feel very embarrassed and guilty about binge eating and will often eat insecret… During and a fter the binge, there are overwhelming feelings of self-loathing and depression about the amount eaten. ” While negative emotions are “normal” to experience in life, some individuals find it hard to express these emotions such as that of anger, sadness and anxiety and thus escalate intoabnormal eating behaviours in order to suppress these overwhelming feelings. “Only 16 percent of young   Australian women are happy with their body weight”,suggests that body image and how one perceive’s their physical self in flicts on a person’s feelings of happiness. Also “45 percent of women and 23 percent of menin the healthy weight range think they are overweight.”. These statistics demonstrate that the majority of society are unhappy about their image and thustheir relationship to food. This leads us to the question, is it normal to be unhappy about one’s body image, as the majority of Australians feel that way? As the expectations of what the “fit, healthy and beautiful body” can reward an individual with becomes more demanding, the symptoms of eating disordersescalate which therefore reflects the internal struggle to understand the “material source of their existence”. Thus the concept of normality and the conflict between an individual’s sense of identity with the norms in a societyimpact significantly on the causation of eating disorders.   As eating disorders have been on the rise, one has to wonder will developingabnormal eating behaviours become the norm in later generations to come?
Similar documents
View more...
Tags
Search Related
We Need Your Support
Thank you for visiting our website and your interest in our free products and services. We are nonprofit website to share and download documents. To the running of this website, we need your help to support us.

Thanks to everyone for your continued support.

No, Thanks