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PURDUE Duke Energy Lesson Plan. Energy Unit Oh My, Oh My, What Energy Choice Will I Choose!

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PURDUE Duke Energy Lesson Plan Author: Jessica Suri School: Unit & Lesson: Grade Level Timeframe Center Grove Middle School North Greenwood, Indiana Energy Unit Oh My, Oh My, What Energy Choice Will
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PURDUE Duke Energy Lesson Plan Author: Jessica Suri School: Unit & Lesson: Grade Level Timeframe Center Grove Middle School North Greenwood, Indiana Energy Unit Oh My, Oh My, What Energy Choice Will I Choose! 6 th grade 3 Block Classes (85 minutes each) 6 Regular Classes (45 minutes each) Brief Summary At the end of this lesson, students will understand several different things about energy, energy usage and energy efficiency. Students will understand the different forms of electrical energy available throughout the United States, which energy sources are used in each state and why it s important to have renewable energy options. Students will also learn how the abundance or lack of a resource can determine what energy source is the best option. Lastly, students will propose a new energy plan for a specific state. I can apply my knowledge of the definitions, processes and costs of different energy sources. Learning Objectives I can infer what forms of energy might be available based on the abundance or lack of natural features or resources within that area. I can analyze and evaluate a state s energy plan and discuss its efficiency or lack thereof. I can collaborate with other states to determine what state is in the most need of an energy reform. I can synthesize a new energy plan that focuses on costs and availability of Literacy in Science Standards: 6-8.LST.4.1: Integrate quantitative or technical information expressed in words in a text with a version of that information expressed visually (e.g., in a flowchart, diagram, model, graph, or table). 6-8.LST.5.2: Write informative texts, including scientific procedures/experiments or technical processes that include precise descriptions and conclusions drawn from data and research. 6-8.LST.5.1: Write arguments focused on discipline specific content. State Standards Indiana State Standards: Nature of Science: Plan and carry out investigation often over a period of several class lessons as a class, in small groups or independently. Collect quantitative data with appropriate tools or technologies and use appropriate units to label numerical data. Keep accurate records in a notebook during investigations. Analyze data, using appropriate mathematical manipulation as required, and use it to identify patterns. Make inferences based on these patterns. Compare the results of an experiment with the prediction. Communicate findings through oral and written reports by using graphs, charts maps and models. Physical Science Describe with examples that potential energy exists in several different forms (e.g., gravitational potential energy, elastic potential energy and chemical potential energy) : Explain that energy may be manifested as heat, light, electricity, mechanical motion, and sound and is often associated with chemical reactions. Science, Engineering and Technology 6.4.3: Describe the transfer of energy amongst energy interactions Daily Lessons Previous Lesson Students will start this lesson already having learned about the different forms of energy and the different forms of energy sources that are available in the United States. They will also have a good understanding about energy transformations and how they work. Engage: Teacher challenges the students to put their geography skills to the test and infer what energy source is dominant in each one of the fifty states. Explore: Students will use the atlas to look up different physical maps of the United States. Based on things like natural features, climate and natural resources, students will predict what the dominant source of energy is in each state. (Students will be advised to work with a partner during this activity so they can have two diverse points of view during the inferring process.) Materials Needed: Colored Pencils Atlases Two sided worksheet; both sides have a blank map of the United States. Map Key with energy symbols. Block 1 (Day 1 & 2) Explain: Students will record their predictions as the corresponding symbols on the side 1 map of the United States. Each form of resource, discussed in class, will have its own symbol color. Explore: At the end of class, each student will randomly draw the name of a state. This is the state they will be researching on next class. (The teacher will research any and all remaining states.) Block 2 (Day 3 & 4) Explore: Students will use various resources, both online and print, to research the energy used in their state. They will record their findings in a data table. The following forms of energy, if used in their state, must be recorded in their data table: Crude Oil, Finished Petroleum Products, Biomass, Hydroelectric, Natural gas, Coal, Nuclear, Geothermal, Solar Energy and Wind. It is also recommended that they copy the 2012 Energy Consumption Graph from the U.S. energy Information Administration website for their specific state. Explain & Elaborate: Students will write one to two paragraphs in their science notebooks. The first paragraph will explain how the dominant energy source works, i.e. what forms of energy are involved and any and all transformations that occur. The second paragraph will focus on why their state uses certain energy sources more than others. (This can include opinion but it needs to include facts as well.) Materials Needed: Access to the Internet (Students will be recommended to use one of the following resources: o o U.S Energy Information Administration. (2012). U.S. States: State Profiles and Energy Estimates. Retrieved June 19 th, 2015 from National Energy Education Development Project. U.S. Energy Geography. Retrieved June 22nd, 2015 from Access to Print Resources Science Notebook Pencil Explain & Elaborate: Students will share their findings state by state. When a students state is announced, they will present two interesting facts and the top non-renewable energy source for their state. The teacher and students will then draw the appropriate symbols on the side 2 map of the United States. Materials Needed: Two sided worksheet; both sides have a blank map of the United States (make). Map Key with Energy Symbols (make) Colored Pencils Science Notebook Pencil Block 3 (Day 5 & 6) Evaluate: Students will randomly be put into groups. Each group will be given one check for $1 million dollars. This check can only be awarded to ONE state per group. Therefore, each student needs to discuss why their state either needs, could have or doesn't need the Once they have made their decision, they will fill out the check and write a two paragraph explanation on the back. Their explanation needs to include why they versus the other states. Secondly, they need to discuss how their state should spend the allotted money on energy and/or energy Their reasoning can include cost, consumer choice and location. Assessments: State Energy Rubric Students will be assessed on their prediction map, data table, short presentation and collaborative group activity. References: U.S Energy Information Administration. (2012). U.S. States: State Profiles and Energy Estimates. Retrieved June 19 th, 2015 from National Energy Education Development Project. U.S. Energy Geography. Retrieved June 22nd, 2015 from Student Name: Grade: Prediction Map Students have made all valid predictions (i.e. energy resources match natural features or ) Each state has one resource identified. Most predictions are valid (i.e. energy resources match natural features or ) Each state has one resource identified. Most or all predictions are valid (i.e. energy resources match natural features or ) Each state only has one of the following: one renewable or resource identified. Student predictions are not valid (i.e. energy resources do not match natural features or ) Each state only has only one of the following: one renewable or resource identified. Not turned in. Data Table in data for all 10 energy in data for 9 or 8 of the 10 energy in data for 7 or 6 of the 10 energy in data for 5 of the 10 energy in less than 5 of the 10 energy Presentation Student shares the following: two interesting facts, the top energy for their state. Student shares three of the following: two interesting facts, the top renewable and energy for their state. Student shares two of the following: two interesting facts, the top energy for their state. Student shares one of the following: two interesting facts, the top energy for their state. Not turned in. Collaboration Student is always engaged in the discussion, openly states their opinion, listens and respects the opinions of other students. Student is usually engaged in the discussion, openly states their opinion, listens and respects the opinions of other students. Student is usually engaged in two of the following: discussion, stating their opinion, listening and respecting the opinions of other students. Student is usually engaged in one of the following: discussion, stating their opinion, listening and respecting the opinions of other students. Student is not engaged in the discussion. Group Decision Their final product has all of the following Their final product has three of the following Their final product has two of the following Their final product has one of the following The group had none of the following
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