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Smithy Street Primary School. Teaching and Learning Handbook. September PDF

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Smithy Street Primary School Teaching and Learning Handbook September 2017 Table of Contents Our Vision statement:... 4 Our School Values:... 4 Approaches to Teaching and Learning in Smithy Street... 5
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Smithy Street Primary School Teaching and Learning Handbook September 2017 Table of Contents Our Vision statement:... 4 Our School Values:... 4 Approaches to Teaching and Learning in Smithy Street... 5 General approach in all subjects:... 5 English... 6 Mathematics... 8 Topic work Science Guidelines for PSHE planning PSHE planning pro forma Religious Education & Collective Worship Music Computing and ICT Overview of supplementary schemes of work we use: Presentation expectations and guidance on sharing and celebrating work: Approaches to yearly planning Approaches to termly planning Approaches to planning a unit The use of Smartboards and PowerPoints Time allocation and guidance per subject Unit Plan Pro-formas: Literacy and Numeracy Science Topic Year One Readiness..,. 45 Year 1 Curriculum Yearly overview of all Learning Objectives Year 1 Termly Overview of Learning Objectives Termly Topic Map Year Year 2 Curriculum Yearly overview of all Learning Objectives Year 2 Termly Overview of Learning Objectives Termly Topic Map Year Year 3 Curriculum Yearly overview of all Learning Objectives Year 3 Termly Overview of Learning Objectives Termly Topic Map Year Year 4 Curriculum Yearly overview of all Learning Objectives Year 4 Termly Overview of Learning Objectives Termly Topic Map Year Year 5 Curriculum Yearly overview of all Learning Objectives Year 5 Termly overview of Learning objectives Termly Topic Map Year Year 6 Curriculum Yearly overview of all Learning Objectives Year 6 Termly overview of Learning objectives Termly Topic Map Year Our Vision statement: At Smithy Street you will: Become a positive, creative thinker and resourceful problem solver. See yourself as a global citizen with a responsibility to help create a better future for yourself and others. Be adaptable and have the skills to be a successful life-long learner in an ever changing world. Be confident and able to challenge yourself to be the best that you can be. Understand your own emotions and show kindness, empathy and tolerance towards others. Be aware of your own cultural heritage and respect those of others. Belong to a caring community where everyone enjoys learning together and celebrating success. Our School Values: Respect Care Responsibility Positive Attitude Collaboration Honesty Approaches to Teaching and Learning in Smithy Street General approach in all subjects: We aim to develop children s interpersonal and collaborative skills. We want them to have frequent opportunities to work together and learn from each other in pairs and groups. This will means that children will have opportunities to work in ability groups as well as mixed ability groups. We want all children to feel included. This means we take their individual learning needs in to account, and ensure that each child is supported to be successful in each lesson. We offer a suitable range of resources to support children s learning. This includes visual (images/ video clips), auditory and kinaesthetic (hands-on/ practical) resources. We want our children to be excited by learning, and will try to find ways of teaching them that acknowledge their interests. We aim to place learning in a real life context where possible, giving children a real purpose to learn, makes learning more relevant to them and encourages them to try their best. This means we will often take our children on trips. We aim to teach children in a cross- curricular way, enabling them to apply skills in different contexts and make links and connections between areas of learning. This also enables us to place learning in a (real-life) context We want our children to be active learners, so we make our teaching interactive and encourage children to ask and answer questions, and challenge themselves and others. We want our children to be reflective learners, so we give them lots of feedback, both verbally and though our marking. We aim to involve children in self and peer assessment too. We want to make full use to the local resources London has to offer, such as museums, music venues, parks and rivers. We want our children to develop an appreciation for The Arts. We encourage them to take part in musical and artistic activities, as part of the curriculum, as well as offering them extra- curricular opportunities. This may involve children missing some regular lessons to take part in additional activities. We want our children to develop a love for sports. We will enable them to take part in sporting events and competitions, as part of the regular curriculum, as well as extra-curricular activities. This may involve children missing some regular lessons to take part in additional activities. We believe in adding depth to pupils learning. Deeper learning involves the delivery of concepts and ideas to pupils in innovative ways that allow them to learn and then apply what they have learned - it should allow a pupil to take what s learned in one situation and apply it to another. English How we structure a unit of work All the objectives and units for our literacy work are based on the suggested Tower Hamlets curriculum. For the majority of our units we follow the suggested texts and teaching sequences from the CLPE s Power of Reading project. We extend some of the units to include non-fiction work and writing across the curriculum. Other units which are not drawn from the Power of Reading are structured according to the phases outlined by the Tower Hamlets literacy team. Wherever possible links are made with other subject areas to provide real life contexts and opportunities for reading and writing across the curriculum. Planning and Key Supporting Documents Termly Topic Maps These set out the units/ texts that are to be taught each term in each year group. Tower Hamlets English National Curriculum Unit Overviews These documents give details of all the learning objectives for each year group, suggested units/ genres to be covered and suggested time frames and phases for each unit. London Borough of Tower Hamlets Reading and Writing Tools Ideas for activities and assessment opportunities can also be taken form the Tower Hamlets Maths Tool kit that is provided on the server in: Assessment folder- LBTH Tools Frequent techniques we use Bookmaking Literature circles Book-based reading games Readers theatre Diagrams and comparison charts Make puppets Make a PowerPoint book Writing in role Tell me booktalk Debate and argument Drawing, annotating and mapping Visual approaches Drama and role play Reading aloud Storytelling Reading journals/ working walls Shared writing Talk for writing Why we have decided we teach this subject in this way and how is this benefitting our children The Power of Reading, which is part of our whole school approach to the literacy curriculum, engages teachers and children in the literacy curriculum through using high quality whole texts and proven teaching approaches. It draws on the Centre for Language in Primary Education s (CLPE s) highly regarded classroom-based research and experience working in schools. It fosters an English curriculum that is creative, engaging and develops a love of literacy for all involved. In Power of Reading project schools children in all year groups have made nearly twice national expected progress in reading and writing. In the project schools the increased rate of progress for boys has narrowed the attainment gap between boys and girls. Project data shows children are also developing more positive attitudes to reading. In addition to this, we have also adopted Pie Corbett s Talk for Writing approach, which enables our children to imitate the language they need for a particular topic orally before reading and analysing it and then writing their own version. In our school we believe teachers deeper knowledge of children s books, combined with innovative teaching approaches, increases children s enjoyment of reading and writing and raises achievement. Mathematics How we structure a unit of work The content for our mathematics units of work is taken from the National Curriculum We have a purpose built schedule for delivering all yearly learning objectives in weekly or fortnightly topics through the year. Key topics are revisited at several points in the year with greater depth to the learning being added Planning and Key Supporting Documents The half termly overview maps Each year group has a half termly overview grid which outlines the strand of maths to be taught each week. Each half termly plan gives a breakdown of the objectives to be taught each week. These plans can be found on the server: Planning folder - Numeracy Supporting documents - Focus Maths. ly plans For each year group a weekly plan has been allocated setting out the objectives that should be covered in that week as the teaching points in each lesson. The plan contains examples of activities that could be used to support the teaching at three ability levels those in need of practice and consolidation, those working at the expected level and those working at greater depth. These activities should be used as teachers to develop their own lesson activities for the week. These can be found in relevant year group folders on the server at: Planning folder - Numeracy Supporting documents - Focus Maths Teachers may wish to further document a weekly plan on the maths planning template provided later in this document or may simply annotate the provided weekly plan Smithy Street Calculations Policy This policy contains the key pencil and paper procedures that will be taught within our school. It has been written to ensure consistency and progression throughout the school and reflects a whole school agreement. Hard copies of the policy are in each class, but it can be found on the server at: Planning folder - Numeracy Supporting documents. London Borough of Tower Hamlets Maths Tool Ideas for activities and assessment opportunities can also be taken form the Tower Hamlets Maths Toolkits. There are clear examples of meeting standards for each national curriculum objective and what it looks like at the end of each term. They can be found on the server at: Assessment Folder- LBTH Tools OR Planning folder - Numeracy Supporting documents. Mathematical Vocabulary for the 2014 National Curriculum Progression of mathematical vocabulary through the year groups, clearly organised into the National Curriculum strands for Mathematics. Teachers have been provided with a hard copy, but it can be found on the server at: Planning folder - Numeracy Supporting documents. Statistics (data) National curriculum objectives for data handling are outlined for Years 2 6, with clear examples to aid planning. Teachers have been provided with a hard copy, but it can be found on the server at: Planning folder - Numeracy Supporting documents. National Curriculum Glossary A hyperlinked mathematics glossary, to aid teachers with mathematical concepts through definitions and examples It can be found on the server at: Planning folder - Numeracy Supporting documents. Frequent techniques we use An emphasis on Mathematical Fluency Mental calculation strategies We are aiming for children to be confident, flexible and secure with a wide range of mental calculation strategies. These are taught throughout the key stages. Recall of Key Facts The recall of multiplication and division facts, number bonds, doubles and halves and Fraction/Decimal/Percentage equivalences is an essential part of maths learning that is on-going throughout the year. A weekly lesson should be devoted to number work regardless of the topic for the week. Maths Starters We use the 5 10 minutes within a lesson to revisit and practise mental strategies and recall of number facts so that children become and remain fluent in all areas of mental calculation It does not have to be of the same strand of maths learning as the main lesson. An emphasis on Mathematical Oracy Pupils are encouraged to explain and justify their mathematical reasoning. Use of talk partners and collaborative learning is made to ensure that explaining processes is seen as important as finding answers and solutions. The language of mathematical reasoning (talk for writing language structures) is to be used to support this process. Hard copies have been given to teachers, and can also be found here: Planning folder - Numeracy Supporting documents Calculation Policy. The use of models, images and practical resources Number lines and arrays are used to develop secure understanding of the four number operations. Visual images and handson practical resources are also frequently used to provide additional support. The use of learning walls will support children as they progress through a unit of work and re-visit previously learning content. The use of Numicon as an aid to number work is encouraged throughout the school. Problem solving and investigating Problem solving and investigative activities should be integrated into daily lessons as much as possible to develop a deeper understanding of mathematical concepts and reasoning skills. Often, activities that include the use of practical equipment such as dice or digit cards help the children to achieve well. When practical activities are carried out by children, this should be recorded in their books with the learning Intention and steps to success, alongside a note or photo of the activity undertaken. Cross- curricular links and a real life context Links between maths and other areas of the curriculum should be made were possible in a unit of work to allow for evidence of deeper learning. Obvious links can be made in measuring and data handling activities within science but creative links with literacy, I.C.T and other non- core subjects can enhance the learning in each of the linked subject areas. Where possible, the learning should be placed in a real life context. Why we have decided we teach this subject in this way and how is this benefitting our children We recognise that children work best using a range of visual, kinaesthetic and auditory strategies (VAK strategies), depending on the type of learner they are. Through encouraging reasoning, problem solving and investigating we believe children will build resilience and creativity in their learning and applying of maths. Providing children with a real life context and making cross curricular links results in them to be more engaged and motivated. We teach in these ways as they are the most effective ways of children becoming confident and secure mathematicians, by deepening and enriching their understanding of mathematical concepts. Topic work How we structure a unit of work Teachers should introduce the children to a Big Question at the start of a unit, which can be pre-determined or childled. It should engage and focus the children, but also be meaningful to their experiences and interests. The Big Question should be introduced with an entry-level activity, referred to often and used for the end outcome. Prior knowledge should be determined, and the children should often be given the opportunity to ask and answer questions. To give the children a visual big picture, an idea of the end goal that they are working towards, the learning journey should be made clear to children at all times, although altered if necessary. To allow deeper learning, teachers should ensure the learning through the unit is focused towards a final outcome. It should provide the pupils with opportunities to demonstrate their understanding of the topic within a recently studied literacy genre. The Big Question should be broken down carefully into a week-by-week structure, which takes into consideration the development of knowledge and skills, and to ensure the end outcome is achieved. Teachers are encouraged to identify areas within topics to place a specific focus and allow deeper to be provided, rather than trying to rush through all the facts related to a topic. Cross-curricular opportunities for reading, writing and maths should be planned for deeper learning. Frequent techniques we use Topic work should be varied, practical, fun and often child-led. Real-life experiences, such as trips, workshops, role-play and research opportunities should be planned to enhance a unit. Language structures should be displayed on a working wall to support the children s independence. Pre-reading should be used in guided reading lessons to maximise the children s interest and knowledge in a topic. Collaboration and constructive talk is valuable when fostering a positive enquiry-led learning culture in class. Talk partner opportunities, debate, drama, sharing of information and thoughtful open questioning should be included regularly. The end of a unit is a time to reflect on the Big Question. Time for an evaluation should be factored in, so the children can compare what they said or thought at the start of the topic and what they now know. Inventive and creative ways of children recording their work is encouraged, but should be in-line with the school s policy. Early Years: As with all Early Years education, the teaching and learning should be child-led, cross-curricular and practical. Possible strategies could include: reading stories, role-play, talking about family members, learning about different traditions, local area walks, talking about different jobs, weather experiments, etc. Why we have decided we teach this subject in this way and how is this benefitting our children Subjects are taught practically, whilst planning for every possible opportunity for cross-curricular teaching. Plans highlight not only the progression in subject knowledge and skills, but key skills like collaboration, enquiry etc. Speaking and listening activities will also be made explicit and are central to sound curriculum planning. This approach also ensures consistency throughout the school. Resources, especially those locally sourced, will ensure learning is made exciting and real. As a result, children are engaged, become curious and start asking questions and directing the learning. The ownership of learning challenges children to think critically and want to learn more; planning must allow some flexibility to take this into account. Science How we structure a unit of work The content for our science units of work has been taken from the National Curriculum. Learning objectives have been made up from the Focus Education Scheme of Work Planning and Key Supporting Document The Termly Topic Maps These set out the topics that are to be taught each term in each year group in each term. Science Termly Learning Objectives The Teaching and Learning Handbook specifies which Learning Objectives are to be taught in each year group in each unit of work Teachers also refer to the working scientifically assessment sheet for their year group when planning. They teach the working scientifically skills across the knowledge strands of the National Curriculum. Frequent techniques we use Year groups plan their unit starting with a hook into the topic to provide context. These hooks allow for a context to be applied to the learning and it also allows for an engaging opening for the children to investigate and question. Many units have a short story or picture book associated to them on the topic map which should be used to provide the hook and subsequent enquiry questions. In science we value investigative lessons, and therefore each lesson is required to include objectives related to this. The majority of the lessons in a unit plan will be practical to develop children s investigative skills and develops their understanding of a range of experiments. We aim to use practical resources, and want children have hands-on experiences. We use trips to give a real life context to science learning. The application of ICT is encouraged and opportunities should be utilised when they arise. Pupils should apply their knowledge of mathematics in order to aid their understanding of scientific concepts. Use shoul
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